Mondays In Louisiana

Mondays In Louisiana

Traditionally, red beans and rice was cooked on Mondays in Louisiana—mostly due to Monday usually being laundry day, a time-consuming task before reliable, modern appliances. Dried beans take hours to simmer (even if soaked the night before will take a while)—so it’s an ideal dish to slowly cook while doing other chores. My design features the Holy Trinity and other key ingredients.

Louisiana Culture Mondays Red Beans Rice tote Quel Parish

Louisiana Culture Mondays Red Beans Rice tote Quel Parish

Side note: it was interesting to me in the early days of the pandemic that one of the first things to fly off grocery shelves were bags of dry beans and rice, like it’s only an emergency or “prepper” food for some people—beyond the obvious usefulness as dry products that can be stockpiled. There still seems to be this idea that it’s a “poor” or last resort food (like Christian finance guru Dave Ramsey advising people to tighten their belts to save money and live on “rice and beans”—like it’s a major sacrifice to eat that way?) . And you know what? Almost every culture on the planet that prioritizes herbs and spices with a sizeable population of poorer, hardworking people know how to stretch bits of meat in a mostly vegetable dish served over a local starch. It’s practical (filling, nutritious) and tasty. I’m proud to come from people who know how to use every thing in their environment and make it good. In our house, we serve it on a very regular basis—with some variations (I make a delicious version without meat, etc.). And yes, we cook it on Mondays.

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